Introduction to Comminution Size Reduction Technology



Synopsis:

The formation of solid-dispersed particle systems as fine as 10 nanometers via comminution is a multi-discipline technology that can create or extend functionality to a broad range of materials.  Learn that “it pays to think small” and develop an understanding for this commercializable technology.  Size reduction technology is applicable in many unrelated areas including pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, microbiology, diagnostic agents, and other advanced solid materials. This course will provide the attendee with an understanding of the characteristics, opportunities and benefits of ultrafine solid particle dispersed systems using comminution size reduction dispersion technology.

Who Should Attend:

R&D managers , engineers, scientists and bio-technologists interested in the value-added consequences and benefits of forming ultrafine particle-based systems of functional materials are encouraged to attend.  The course is primarily targetted at the B.S. level, but graduate and postgradaute level students seeking a very introductory overview of this processing technology will also greatly benefit from the course.

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Introduction to Comminution Size Reduction Technology

Topics Covered:

Introduction 
Ground rules
Interactive (Q&A encouraged and welcome)
Overview of schedule, presentation, breaks, discussion
Comminution Technology
Technology and miniaturization- think tiny
Vision (Richard Smalley)
Why miniaturization-faster/smaller/cheaper
Particle Building Blocks (diagram)
Dispersions and coatings
High surface area materials
Consolidated materials and parts
What is Fine Particle Technology ???
Formation of Solid Particles - comminution technology
Types of dispersed systems (solid/gas, solid/liquid, solid/solid)
Conventional Size Reduction Capabilities (sub-micron systems) and Bead milling technology
Micro-milling and capabilities (nanoparticle formation)
Applications for this technology
Pharmaceuticals, Implant Technology,
Microbiology, Cosmeceuticals, Neutriceuticals, others (Information storage, inks, electronics  mineral processing, office products, agricultural products)
Characteristics of sub-micron and nanoparticle solid-dispersed systems
Established technology, Excellent dispersion stability
Property amplification, Reliable analytical methods
Comparison of size reduction methods
Processing speed and output, Dispersion purity
Cost, Process scalability, Skill level, Process flexibility
Solids content, Capital expense, Extent of size reduction
Comparison of sub-micron and nanoparticle systems:
Size, surface area, number of particle per unit weight
Purity, Micrographs
What are limits of size-reduction and bead milling technology?
Size, surface area expectations (10X better than sub-micron)
What are characteristics of fine particles that make for commercial utility?
Solubility amplification, Surface area sensitive properties
Incorporation technology for high value materials
Incorporation of insoluble materials
Elimination of hazardous organic solvents
Physics of light scattering (more spectrally selective pigments)
How compelling are potential applications for – ultrafine particles and size reduction technology?

Where are opportunities for ultrafine solid systems and size reduction technology ?

Drug Delivery, Neutriceuticals, Cosmeceuticals,
Advanced materials, Diagnostic agents, Biotechnology, Microbiology, Catalysis, others (pigment related systems -colorants, cosmetics, inks, coatings semiconductor technology, optics, foods, pesticides, flame retardants)
Commercial benefits of ultrafine particle systems:
Property enhancement, Reduced material costs
Improved performance, Reduced cost of use
Simplified production, Improved yield
Intellectual property coverage/web sites/ publications

Examples of nano-dispersed and sub-micron solid particle systems


Leveraging Size-reduction technology/ technology transfer
Formulary considerations, Process Considerations
Process Scaleability
Criteria for preparing fine solid-particle dispersions via size reduction
Solubility of dispersed phase in liquid medium
Stability of dispersed phases (physical, chemical,   morphological)
Friability, Size of dispersed phase
Consistency of dispersed phase
Development of VALUE-ADDED dispersed systems (experimental)
Define medium for dispersed phase
Define customers objectives
Identify characterization and analytical methods for  dispersed systems and starting materials
Understand the effects of particle size and
distribution
on product response

Demonstrate technical feasibility for such processing
Demonstrate small-scale manufacturability and full scale manufacturability

 

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Instructor

John Bishop has over thirty years of industrial experience in fine particle and coating technologies.  He received his chemical engineering degree from Villanova University and  has been employed by Eastman Kodak Company.  He is an experienced particle dispersion technologist, and an enthusiastic lecturer and technology-transfer agent.  He has developed, scaled-up and commercialized solid dispersed systems for a broad range of applications including pharmaceuticals, ink-jet imaging, diagnostic health sciences and others high-value markets.  He is an inventor and author of twenty-four patents and several technical articles.  He has received awards including induction into Kodak’s Distinguished Inventors’ Gallery and several innovation awards for novel technical accomplishments. He recently has been consulting in the Pacific Rim. He is a strong proponent of the adage” it pays to think small”.
 

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(C)  2006  Particles Conference