Modern Methods of Particle Size Distribution:

Assessment and Characterization



Synopsis:

There are more than twenty particle size measurement methods (non-fractionation and fractionation methods) commercially available for characterizing particle size and particle size distribution of particulates, particulate formulations, suspensions and dispersions. In addition to a discussion of basic concepts of particle size statistics and distribution and sampling considerations, this course will discuss the principles of measurement, instrumentation, applicable size range of measurement, resolution, features, benefits, and limitations of many of these methods. The application of these methods to problem solving for a variety of particulate systems will be emphasized. All of the information provided in this course will be brought together at the end of the day in a discussion on how to select a particle sizer.

How You Will Benefit from This Course:

Consult with experts and learn how to solve your particle size information problems.
Learn about particle size statistics and distributions and population sampling.
Study specific experimental methods for particle fractionation (sedimentation, CHDF, HDC, FFF) and learn about their features, benefits and limitations.
Study specific experimental non-fractionation methods (dynamic light scattering, Fraunhofer diffraction, single particle optical sensing, acoustic attenuation) and learn about their features, benefits and limitations.
Learn about the measurement of zeta potential and usefulness for evaluating colloid stability.
Find out about advances in particle size distribution characterization anticipated in the future.
Be able to select the best measurement methods for specific particle size ranges and specific particle systems and problems.
Learn cost-effective methods for obtaining particle size information for solving your research problems.
 

Who Should Attend:

Scientists, engineers, product development chemists, technicians, formulators and R&D managers who need to understand how to characterize and quantify particle size in order to better evaluate and control particulates, particulate formulations, suspensions and dispersions.

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Topics Covered:

Modern Methods of particle Size Distribution: Assessment and Characterization
 
* Introduction Overview of schedule, presentation, breaks
 
* Basic Concepts Measurement requirements
Overview of fractionation methods
Overview of non-fractionation methods
Commercially available particle size measurement techniques
Concept of a distribution
Particle size statistics
Sampling issues
References to the literature
 
* Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS, PCS) Aliases, history
Principles, theory
Instrumentation
Applications
Features, benefits, limitations
Measurement size range of utility
 
* Measurement of Zeta Potential Definition of zeta potential
Relationship to colloid stability
Principles of measurement
Applications
 
* Single Particle Optical Sensing (SPOS) Principles of measurement
Instrumentation
Applications
Measurement size range of utility
Features, benefits, limitations
 
* Acoustic Attenuation Spectroscopy for Particle Size Analysis Principles of measurement
Instrumentation
Data Treatment
Applications to concentrated dispersions
Measurement size range of utility
Features, benefits, limitations
 
* Particle and Droplet Size Distribution Analysis By Laser Light Diffraction
Principles of measurement
Instrumentation
Applications
Measurement size range of utility
Features, benefits, limitations
 
* Chromatography Methods for Particle Size Analysis (CHDF & HDC; SFFF, FlFFF) Principles of measurement
Instrumentation
Applications
Measurement size range of utility
Features, benefits, limitations
 
* Sedimentation Methods (Gravitational, Centrifugal) Stokes Law
Principles of measurement
Instrumentation
Operational variables
Sample preparation issues
Applications
Measurement size range of utility
Features, benefits, limitations
 
 
* How to Select a Particle Sizer General questions to ask
Classification of techniques
Typical problems in particle sizing
Zero to infinity instruments
Information content
Quantitative specifications
Sample throughput
Qualitative specifications
Sample preparation
 
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Course Director/Instructor

Dr. Theodore Provder currently is Director, Coatings Research Institute in the College of Technology at Eastern Michigan University and Director of the NSF I/UCRC Research Center in Coatings. He also has served as Director of Program Organization, for the Institute of Materials Science Inc.- New Paltz. Dr. Provder is an Adjunct Professor at Case Western Reserve University (Macromolecular Science), Kent State University (Chemistry) and North Dakota State University (Polymer and Coatings). He has over 37 years of industrial experience in polymers and coatings with 29 years at The Glidden Company. Dr. Provder is credited with over 120 publications, 17 edited books and 3 patents. He has received numerous technical awards including the ACS Roy Wetness Award in Coatings, the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) coveted Joseph J. Mattellio Lectureship Award, FSCT 1999 First Place Roon Award, the University of Missouri-Rolla Coatings Institute Distinguished Scientist Award, appointment to the 2000 (first) class of PMSE Fellows and the 2003 PMSE Distinguished Service Award.

Instructors

Dr. Bruce Weiner is the cofounder and president of Brookhaven Instruments Corporation in Holtsville, New York. He has lectured extensively and published many articles on particle sizing using dynamic light scattering, Fraunhofer diffraction, x-ray and photosedimentation, and time of transition. In addition, he has lectured widely on the use of electrophoretic light scattering in zeta potential determination. Dr. Weiner also is working on the use of phase analysis light scattering for zeta potential determination in solvents, oils and other low mobility systems.

Dr. Peter Faraday is Vice President , SYMPATEC Inc., Princeton, New Jersey and is well versed in the use of laser light scattering methods (Fraunhofer diffraction) for the measurement of particle and droplet size distribution analysis for many diverse applications.

Dr. David Nicoli is President, Particle Sizing Systems  Inc., Santa Barbara, California. He was an assistant Professor in Physics at the University of California in Santa Barbara before founding Nicomp Instruments and subsequently founding Particle Sizing Systems. His expertise encompasses static and dynamic light scattering, single optical particle sensing and on-line particle size analysis.

Dr. Tonis Oja is Sales Manager for Matec Applied Sciences, Northborough, MA in the areas of Particle Size and Zeta Potential  measurement instrumentation.

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(C)  2002,2003  Particles Conference